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Coventry Shed

LMS Route: Rugby to Wolverhampton
LMS Route: Nuneaton to Leamington

Coventry's first engine shed was built in 1838 at the same time as the London to Birmingham Railway opened their station as seen illustrated in Gerald Broom's superb painting which features both the station and 'Engine House'. It was allegedly used by the Midland Railway after the LNWR built a new shed in 1867, sited alongside Quinton Road and in the vee of the Leamington junction with the main line to London. The London & Birmingham 'Engine House' was described by Francis Whishaw in his book 'The Railways of Great Britain and Ireland' with the following comment: There is an locomotive engine house at Coventry to hold one engine and tender with folding gates at the entrance; within these are a smith's forge, anvil and bench. In their book LMS Engine Sheds - Volume One - The LNWR Chris Hawkins and George Reeve state that 'the 1867 building, which was a non-standard design, had a pitched slated roof with two arched entrances. In 1897 the shed was doubled in size, after Webb had complained that the allocation of eight locomotives was too great for the room available. The extension was based upon the original design although the front of the shed was opened up by the use of lintels and cast iron columns supporting the front gable roof. According to Hawkins and Reeve, the 1897 extension made use of the materials being dismantled at Crewe.

Whilst the enlarged shed was provided with a 42 foot turntable the other maintenance and service facilities were still very basic. The coaling of locomotives was undertaken manually. The coal being transferred directly from the coal wagon into the locomotive although a coaling shelter was provided on the side of the shed to provide some protection from inclement weather. Coventry shed was a sub-shed of Rugby and whilst the city was significantly larger and more prosperous than its near neighbours of Rugby and Nuneaton, it was always a second division shed. Its locomotives were in the main allocated to local workings in the area, primarily mineral traffic, and any major servicing and repairs were carried out at Rugby some ten miles away. The turntable was replaced by a 57 foot turntable during its LMS ownership on a site slightly to the north of the original 42 foot turntable. It wasn't until the mid-fifties that the decrepid state of the shed was tackled by British Railways who built a modern and airy structure of brick walls and corrugated steel to the front elevation. Coaling was also addressed by being part mechanised through the provision of a coal conveyor belt which allowed coal to be loaded by hand into its hopper and then up via the belt where it fell into the locomotive's tender or bunker. However this modernisation occurred at the same time as the shed saw a significant loss of traffic as the short workings it specialised in were affected by the growth of motor transport and it eventually closed on 17th November 1958 along with the shed in Milverton, Warwick. The shed was then used for many years to store condemned locomotives, some being marooned during the rebuilding of the station and the new power signal box by contractors cut off the yard.

The following is an extract from one of Reg Kimber's scrapbooks compiled over 50 years.

Extract from the biography of JM Dunn reflecting on his long career associated with sheds of the LNWR and BR

Coventry Shed

Coventry Shed which had been built in 1865-1866 to provide accommodation for 4 engines, was extended soon after 1896 and had four roads each 100 feet long. It was provided with a 42 ft. turntable

1 - L.M.S. 2-6-2 3 PT Parallel boiler) 103
5 - Mid. 0-6-0 2F 3010, 3518, 3571, 3691. 3726
2 - L.N.W. 0-6-2 18 in. Tanks 6890, 6924
2 - L.N.W. 0-6-0 18 in. Goods 8367, 8513
5 - L.N.W. 0-8-0 G1 8892, 8895, 8926, 9133, 9135, 9340

Later there were slight changes. There were 30 sets of men. Mr. Clews of Rugby was appointed an assistant to the Super-intendent of Motive Power at Watford Headquarters in June 1940 and was succeeded by Mr. S. T. Clayton. In October heavy air-raids on Coventry started and it was the usual all too familiar tale which need not be repeated, though perhaps I may mention my experiences on the morning of Friday, the 15th November 1940 after the heaviest raid of the lot, for all of which we have to thank the internal combustion engine, the flying machine and the clever men who, as is usually the case, were just not quite clever enough. Fortunately for me I had been unable to obtain lodgings in Coventry and was travelling daily from and to my home at Nuneaton.

On this particular morning the train was unable to go beyond Longford owing to the line having been damaged and I had to walk all the way from there to Coventry and through what was left of it to the station, which was on the far side of the town. I got to the engine shed about n.o a.m. and found the place deserted. Two coaches of a passenger train standing on the down Leamington line opposite the shed were blown to pieces, the passengers fortunately having got out a few minutes earlier. There was a string of about half-a-dozen "dead" engines standing on one of the through roads at the station where another bomb had dropped at the Rugby end of the up platform and brought down about 15 yards of the platform roofing.

There was neither water nor electricity and as all the wires had been brought down there was neither telegraphic nor telephonic communication in any direction. A bomb had dropped in the yard at the Birmingham end of the station and blown up about 50 wagons which were piled high. The engine shed had escaped with nothing worse than a few broken windows and I am thankful to be able to record that not a single member of the motive power staff sustained even the slightest scratch.

On Tuesday, the 28th January 1941 I received a telephone message from the Police Station asking my name as "someone" wanted to see me. I gave my name and asked what was the matter but the only answer I got was a chuckle and a remark that I'd soon find out! Not long after one of the staff knocked on my office door and said a lady wanted to see me. My visitor was an elderly- I might say "old"-well-educated but somewhat shabby-looking lady who was very short of breath-so short, in fact, that it was about five minutes before she could talk. I gave her a seat, told her to take her time and waited with considerable curiosity for her to speak. When at last she did so she talked for about ten minutes about her hospital experiences in the War-to-End-Wars and said that her brother had been an Admiral in the Royal Navy. Then she said that she believed the police had spoken to me about her, that she had an "idea" and asked if I would tell her how much space there was underneath a railway engine?! Well, I told her and said that if she liked to take me into her confidence and say what her idea was, I might be able to help her.

To cut a long story short she wanted to turn the steam-"smoke" she called it-from the chimney into a perforated box underneath the engine so that the exhaust would not be visible from enemy aircraft. I told her that what she called "smoke" was 90 per cent steam and tried to explain as well as I could why her idea was impracticable. It took some doing but I think I eventually convinced her and she went away full of thanks and apologies. I never heard any more of her.

Going to Coventry in the train on the 21st March 1941, a man attempted to get out of the carriage on the wrong side at Foleshill and if I hadn't grabbed him he would have landed on the rails in front of an engine going towards Nuneaton. I reported the incident on arrival at Coventry and the next morning the Station Master told me that acting on my information they had caught two men doing the same thing that morning and handed them over to the police.

After another air-raid on the 11 th April 1941 we suspected that an unexploded bomb had fallen in the "six-foot" near the shed signal and had buried itself under the track but there was little sign except that the ballast appeared to have been disturbed. Anyhow it was quite enough for me and as soon as telephonic communication had been restored I reported the matter to the Regional Commissioner's office and asked them to send some bomb-disposers to have a look at it. In a few hours time a couple of policemen came and started prodding the ground with iron rods while I kept well out of the way but they soon gave it up and went off. Nobody else appeared so I once more 'phoned the Commissioner's Office and they replied that as it had been there for 48 hours without exploding they considered it was a "dud" and did not intend taking any further action. I answered that it was bad enough having to work in the place when bombs were falling without having to move engines over the top of possibly "dud" bombs afterwards and that they could give my compliments to the Regional Commissioner in person and tell him that I was not going either to ask or allow any of my staff to take any engine anywhere near the spot until a proper investigation had been made and that he could do what he liked about it. In the meantime no engine was going to leave Coventry Shed.

An hour or so after that a lorry load of soldiers and beer (which latter they well deserved!) arrived and they began to dig. After taking up a section of the permanent way they eventually found the bomb at a depth of about 12 feet right under the "four-foot". After they had successfully performed the tricky feat of removing the fuse they tied a rope round the bomb and fastened the other end to the drawbar of an engine which then moved ahead and so pulled the "find" to the surface. The last I saw of the bomb was a soldier sitting on it on the pavement of Quinton Road drinking a bottle of beer!

On the 15th April 1941 Lord Stamp of Shortlands, the President of the London Midland and Scottish Railway Company, his wife and son were drowned when a dug-out in which they were sheltering at their home in Kent was flooded through a water-main being bombed. Lord Stamp, I think, had the distinction of being almost the only prominent figure in the British railway world after whom no engine was ever named. A railway antiquity at Coventry was the water-column at the Birmingham end of the down platform which had been made by Bury, Curtis & Kennedy. It is now in the Museum of British Transport at Clapham.

Back at Coventry on the 24th September 1941 I received instructions concerning a special train of such a nature that I thought it best to go myself to the homes of the men concerned to give them their instructions instead of sending verbal or written messages. I accordingly set out on the errand walking from one end of the town to the other and as it was a beautiful but very hot day I was a bit footsore before I got back to the shed. The train was W699, due to arrive at Coventry the next night and I had to be there to see to things. The passenger was no other than Winston Churchill who was going to spend the night in the train in a siding at Berkswell before visiting Coventry the next day.

A certain locomotive inspector who shall be nameless had the job of going to Berkswell with the train and seeing that all the arrangements for stabling and heating it were properly carried out and during the time we were awaiting its arrival at Coventry. I had the pleasure of witnessing as fine an exhibition of the antics of what are often called by railwaymen "hard-hatted swine" as one could wish for. First, Mr. Inspector bawled across the station to the driver of an engine whose headlamp he considered was "dim". Then an engine came round the corner from Leamington with a red headlamp and he chased and roared after that. Next an engine arrived from Birmingham and began to "blow-off" whereupon Mr. Inspector did likewise. After that another engine came along en route for Berkswell and he wanted to know the why and the wherefore; in his opinion, expressed at the top of his voice, it was q uite unnecessary and so on. Shortly after that the special, W699, arrived five minutes before time and with only one headlamd alight instead of two which occasioned another outburst of song. I could hold my tongue no longer so told him that I thought he'd had an exceedingly good bag and that when next he went to bed he ought to be able to sleep with a clear conscience!

The train having departed with the vocalist on the footplate I went to bed in "The Crow's Nest", the stone-built platelayers' hut which my fitters had commandeered and made into exceedingly comfortable quarters which I used whenever I had to spend the night at the shed. The following morning in spite of all the "secrecy" and my efforts in that connection, not only the platform but the station approach and streets as far as one could see were packed tight with sightseers. Just before 10.0 a.m. when the train was due to arrive I took up my position, away from the crowd, near the man with the red flag at which point the engine was supposed to come to a stand.

Presently the train came round the corner by No. 3 signal box running, as it seemed to me, rather slowly and with steam shut off and then when the engine was about half-way between Nos. 3 and 1 boxes she was suddenly given steam and after uttering half-a- dozen sonorous puffs came to a dead stand with a sort of dying gasp! The platform, of course, was full of "big-wigs" of one sort or another from the Earl of Dudley down to the Mayor and Mayoress of Coventry together with the local Home Guard and the usual L.M.S. factotums. Everyone's eyes almost came out of their heads and I at once thought to myself-"A vacuum failure!"-I picked up my heels and ran along the platform as fast as I could go, ignoring the questions of "What's the matter?" and down the line to the engine. The vocalist of the previous night was on the footplate and I asked him what was wrong. He didn't know but the vacuum had suddenly gone back ten inches, thus partially applying the brake and he'd told the driver to drag the train into the station. Then they had seen the guard signalling them to stop and they had done so. Having found there was nothing wrong with the engine I walked on at a more leisurely pace along the train until I came to the rear brake van from the window of which a bowler-hatted and blue- mackintoshed individual put out his head and said "It's all right. We're waiting for time. He hasn't finished his breakfast!" At that I said a few things, went back to the engine and rode on it into the station where we arrived ten minutes late. HE had still not finished his breakfast and the train stood for some minutes at the platform before he got out. I suppose it was all part of the Churchillian showmanship and in line with the other instance when, as his train was passing through Nuneaton at a good speed he caused a full application of the brake to be made so that the train stopped dead in almost its own length and he jumped out shouting for a telephone on which, when he was taken to it, he booked two seats for a London theatre!

The grimness of the National Emergency was occasionally relieved by comic or semi-comic interludes, an example of which was provided by one Foskett, a man of aristocratic appearance and demeanour, who was station-master at Bedworth. When airraid warnings were received while trains were in Bedworth station he would walk along the platform calling out- "Bedworth-Air Raid-Bed'urth (in the vernacular)-Pull down the blinds-BEDWORTH (in precise English)-Air-Raid- Bed'urth" and so on.

Mr. Foskett was fond of travelling over the remote railways in Ireland with ordinary full-fare first-class tickets and leading the local railwaymen to believe that he was a senior officer, if not a director! He did not tell them that he was, in so many words, but behaved and passed remarks in such a manner that such a conclusion was nearly inevitable. He never used free or privilege tickets on these expeditions as they would, of course, have given him away. The 21 st November 1941 saw me appointed Running Shed Foreman at Coventry vice Reynolds who had been promoted in his absence to Sutton Oak. In early June 1942 I was advised that I was going back to Nuneaton with the temporary appointment of "chief" as Mr. Darlington was taking up another temporary post at Rugby. Before leaving Coventry I must mention the excellent work performed by the deputy Running Shed Foreman, Driver E. J. Watkin who night after night, week after week, all through the period of the air-raids, was in charge of Coventry engine shed during the dangerous night hours. He never flinched from the job and when I left for Nuneaton I recommended him as my successor. If ever any man earned an appointment he did and I am pleased to say that soon afterwards he was given the post.

Coventry Station Locomotives seen at Coventry Station Coventry Shed (43)

The London & Birmingham Railway's Engine House located at Coventry Station

Painting showing Coventry Station looking towards Birmingham with the 1838 engine shed on the left and the original station on the right
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G Broom GRA
Looking towards Birmingham with the 1838 L&BR engine shed on the left and the original station on the right
Close up showing the London and Birmingham Railway pump house that was sited at the rear of the engine shed
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BR
Close up showing the London and Birmingham Railway pump house that was sited at the rear of the engine shed
View showing the L&B locomotive shed on the left, Coventry No 2 Signal box in the middle and the parcel depot bay on the right
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HW Robinson
The L&B locomotive shed on the left, Coventry No 2 Signal box in the centre and the parcel bay on the right
Close up of the 1920 OS map showing the location of the London & Birmingham Engine House erected in 1838
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Ordnance Survey
Close up of the 1920 OS map showing the location of the London & Birmingham Engine House erected in 1838

The L&NWR 1867 'Stafford designed' Locomotive Steam Shed erected at Coventry

Front elevation of the 1867 Coventry Locomotive Steam Shed designed by Stafford drawing office
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LNWR
Front elevation of the 1867 Coventry Locomotive Steam Shed designed by Stafford drawing office
Part of side elevation of the 1867 Coventry Locomotive Steam Shed designed by Stafford drawing office
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LNWR
Part of side elevation of the 1867 Coventry Locomotive Steam Shed designed by Stafford drawing office
The front section of the side elevation of the Locomotive Steam Shed designed by Stafford drawing office
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LNWR
The front section of the side elevation of the Locomotive Steam Shed designed by Stafford drawing office

The enlarged and modified L&NWR's 1897 Locomotive Steam Shed erected at Coventry

A classic view of Coventry shed and yard with LMS coal wagons and ex-LNWR and LMS locomotives on shed
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B Matthews
A classic view of Coventry shed and yard with LMS coal wagons and ex-LNWR and LMS locomotives on shed
Close up showing an ex-LNWR Webb 1P 2-4-2T standing next to the watercrane having been coaled
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B Matthews
Close up showing an ex-LNWR Webb 1P 2-4-2T standing next to the watercrane having been coaled
Close up showing LMS 4P Compound 4-4-0 No 1172 standing next to an unidentified ex-LNWR 0-8-0 G2 class locomotive
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B Matthews
Close up of LMS 4P Compound 4-4-0 No 1172 and unidentified ex-LNWR 0-8-0 G2 class locomotive
Ex-LNWR 0-8-0 class G2 No 9429 and ex-LNWR class G2a No 9340 in steam standing in front of Coventry shed
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VR Webster
Ex-LNWR 0-8-0 class G2 No 9429 and ex-LNWR class G2a No 9340 in steam standing in front of Coventry shed
Ex-LMS 2-6-0 2MT No 46446 is seen standing in front of an unidentified ex-LNWR 0-8-0 'Super D' locomotive on No 4 road of Coventry's old shed
Ref: lnwrcov1590
R Reed
Ex-LMS 2-6-0 2MT No 46446 is seen standing in front of an unidentified ex-LNWR 0-8-0 'Super D' locomotive

BR built 2MT 2-6-2T No 41236 stands outside the original shed next to an unidentified ex-LMS 0-6-0 4F locomotive
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Anon
BR built 2MT 2-6-2T No 41236 stands outside the original shed next to an unidentified ex-LMS 0-6-0 4F locomotive
Ex-LMS 2-6-2T 3MT No 40157 is seen standing in line with ex-LNWR 0-8-0 7F No 49424 outside the shed
Ref: lnwrcov1589
Weston Collection
Ex-LMS 2-6-2T 3MT No 40157 is seen standing in line with ex-LNWR 0-8-0 7F No 49424 outside the shed
Ex-LMS 2-6-4T 4P No 42541 and ex-LMS 2-6-0 2MT No 46445 are seen standing standing with other locomotives at Coventry's old shed
Ref: lnwrcov1587
R Reed
Ex-LMS 2-6-4T 4P No 42541 & ex-LMS 2-6-0 2MT No 46445 standing with other engines at Coventry's old shed
Ex-LMS 2-6-2T 3MT still carrying LMS No 204 is seen alongside ex-LNWR 2-4-2T 1P Precursor Tank carrying its new British Railways No 46749
Ref: lnwrcov674
HW Robinson
Ex-LMS 2-6-2T 3MT is still carrying LMS No 204 whilst ex-LNWR 1P 2-4-2T carries its new BR No 46749
Ex-LMS 4P Compound 4-4-0 No 41122 receives attention to its outside cylinders outside Coventry shed
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HF Wheeller
Ex-LMS 4P Compound 4-4-0 No 41122 receives attention to its outside cylinders outside Coventry shed

Close up showing the loco coal wagons being placed on the coal bank beneath Coventry's coaling shelter
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VR Webster
Close up showing the loco coal wagons being placed on the coal bank beneath Coventry's coaling shelter
Close up showing the coal picker and coal shovel hanging on either side of the gas lit lamppost
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Anon
Close up showing the coal picker and coal shovel hanging on either side of the gas lit lamppost
Close up showing the remodelled shed entrance and the inspection pits located outside the shed
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Anon
Close up showing the remodelled shed entrance and the inspection pits located outside the shed
BR built 2-6-0 2MT No 46445 stands with its tender inside Coventry shed amongst several other ex-LNWR goods engines
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Anon
BR built 2-6-0 2MT No 46445 stands with its tender inside Coventry shed amongst several other goods engines
Ex-LMS 2-6-4T 4MT No 42577 is seen in steam standing on road 4 in line in front of two ex-LNWR 0-8-0 'Super Ds'
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Anon
Ex-LMS 2-6-4T 4MT No 42577 is seen in steam standing on road 4 in line in front of two ex-LNWR 0-8-0 'Super Ds'

Ex-LMS Fowler 2-6-2T No 40002 is seen on shed in company with another LMS design and in the background a LNWR goods engine
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Anon
Ex-LMS Fowler 2-6-2T No 40002 is seen on shed in company with another LMS locomotive

The 1956 British Railways rebuilt shed

View of the new British Railways built shed and a mixture of ex-LMS and ex-LNWR goods and mixed traffic locomotives
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H C Casserley
The new British Railways built shed and a mixture of ex-LMS and ex-LNWR goods and mixed traffic locomotives
Close up showing an ex-LMS 2MT 2-6-0 locomotive being coaled by Coventry's new conveyor belt
Ref: lnwrcov666a
H C Casserley
Close up showing an ex-LMS 2MT 2-6-0 locomotive being coaled by Coventry's new conveyor belt
Ex-LMS 2-8-0 8F No 48616 is seen carrying a 18A Toton shed plate as it comes off Coventry shed having been coaled and watered
Ref: lnwrcov664
Anon
Ex-LMS 2-8-0 8F No 48616 comes off Coventry shed having been serviced, coaled and watered
Close up of the rear wall of the shed showing the various notice boards and the doors to the offices and workshops
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Anon
Close up of the rear wall of the shed showing the various notice boards and the doors to the offices and workshops
A general view of the British Railways rebuilt shed at Coventry with only LMS designed locomotives in view
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Anon
A general view of the British Railways rebuilt shed at Coventry with only LMS designed locomotives in view

Close up showing the new coaling arrangements comprising single road shelter and a coal conveyor
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Anon
Close up showing the new coaling arrangements comprising single road shelter and a coal conveyor
View of ex-LMS 2-8-0 8F No 48723 is seen in tandem with an unidentified member of the same class coming off shed after being coaled
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Anon
Ex-LMS 8F 2-8-0 No 48723 pilots an unidentified member of the same class coming off shed after being coaled
British Railways 4-6-2 Britannia class No 70022 'Tornado' is seen in a very dirty condition standing on Coventry shed's coal road
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Anon
BR 4-6-2 7MT No 70022 'Tornado' is seen in a very dirty condition standing on Coventry shed's coal road

The carriage sidings

Close up showing a Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU) standing in the carriage sidings which were located opposite the shed
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J Hyde
Close up showing a DMU standing in the carriage sidings which were located opposite the shed
Close up showing ex-LMS 2-6-2T 3MT No 40205 reversing empty coaching stock into the carriage sidings
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R Blenkinsop
Close up showing ex-LMS 2-6-2T 3MT No 40205 reversing empty coaching stock into the carriage sidings

Locomotives seen on shed

Ex-LNWR 4-4-0 3P George V class No 5320 'George V' is seen standing on the coaling road in front of Coventry shed
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LGRP
Ex-LNWR 4-4-0 3P George V class No 5320 'George V' is seen standing on the coaling road in front of Coventry shed
Ex-LMS 4-6-0 5XP Patriot class No 5533 'Lord Rathmore' is seen being turned on Coventry shed's 57 foot turntable on 20th June 1949
Ref: lnwrcov1586
Weston Collection
Ex-LMS 4-6-0 5XP No 5533 'Lord Rathmore' is seen being turned on Coventry shed's 57 foot turntable
Ex-LNWR 4P 4-6-2T No 6980 stands fully coaled and watered on 12th May 1934 in front of Quinton Road fence
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Anon
Ex-LNWR 4P 4-6-2T No 6980 stands fully coaled and watered on 12th May 1934 in front of Quinton Road fence
Ex-LNWR 2-4-2T 1P No 46654 is seen near to ex-MR 0-6-0 2F No 58217 and ex-LMS 2-6-2T 3MT No 40205
Ref: lnwrcov1588
R Blenkinsop
Ex-LNWR 2-4-2T 1P No 46654 is seen near to ex-MR 0-6-0 2F No 58217 and ex-LMS 2-6-2T 3MT No 40205
Ex-LMS 2-6-0 2MT No 46420 is seen standing in front of an unidentified ex-LNWR 0-8-0 'Super D' and an unidentified ex-LMS 2-8-0 8F locomotive
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Anon
Ex-LMS 2-6-0 2MT No 46420 stands in front of an unknown ex-LNWR 0-8-0 and an ex-LMS 2-8-0 8F locomotive

Ex-LMS 2-6-4T 4MT No 42573 is seen standing on Coventry shed's No 1 road in front of an unidentified ex-LNWR 0-8-0 'Super D' locomotive
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Anon
Ex-LMS 2-6-4T 4MT No 42573 standing in front of Coventry shed with an unidentified ex-LNWR 0-8-0 'Super D'
Ex-LMS 4-6-0 5XP Jubilee class No 45601 'British Guina' has been turned on the turntable and now stands alongside ex-LMS 2-6-4T No 42309
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Anon
Ex-LMS 4-6-0 5XP No 45601 'British Guiana', turned on the turntable, now stands next to ex-LMS 2-6-4T No 42309
An unidentified ex-LNWR 0-8-0 7F 'Super D' locomotive is seen standing cold inside of Coventry's new shed on a Sunday
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Anon
An unidentified ex-LNWR 0-8-0 7F 'Super D' locomotive standing cold inside of Coventry's new shed on a Sunday
A very grimy ex-LNWR 0-8-0 7F 'Super D' is seen standing in line with an unknown ex-LMS 0-4-4T behind its tender
Ref: lnwrcov665
Anon
A very grimy ex-LNWR 7F 0-8-0 'Super D' is seen standing in line with an unknown ex-LMS 0-4-4T behind its tender
Ex-LMS 2-6-4T 4MT No 42669 stands on shed alongside ex-LMS 2-6-0 No 46420 and an unidentified ex-LMS 2-8-0 8F locomotive
Ref: lnwrcov661
R Reed
Ex-LMS 4MT 2-6-4T No 42669 stands alongside ex-LMS 2-6-0 No 46420 and an unknown ex-LMS 2-8-0 8F locomotive

Locomotives stored at Coventry Shed

Another view of ex-LMS 0-4-4T 2P No 41902 this time in store at the head of an ex-LMS ventilated van inside Coventry's new shed
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Anon
Another view of ex-LMS 0-4-4T 2P No 41902 this time in store at the head of an ex-LMS ventilated van
View of a pair of ex-LMS 4-6-0 Jubilee class locomotives No 45624 'St Helena' and No 45599 'Bechuanaland' standing stored outside of Coventry shed
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Anon
Ex-LMS 5XP 4-6-0 No 45624 'St Helena' and No 45599 'Bechuanaland' stand stored outside of Coventry shed
Another view of ex-LMS 4-6-0 Jubilee class No 45599 'Bechuanaland' standing with other withdrawn locomotives at Coventry's new shed
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Anon
Another view of ex-LMS 4-6-0 Jubilee class No 45599 'Bechuanaland' standing with other withdrawn locomotives
Another view of ex-LMS 4-6-0 Jubilee class No 45599 'Bechuanaland' standing with other withdrawn locomotives at Coventry's new shed
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Anon
Another view of ex-LMS 4-6-0 Jubilee class No 45599 'Bechuanaland' standing with other withdrawn locomotives
View of Coventry's British Railways built shed now being used to store condemned locomotives including in this view three ex-LMS 2P 4-4-0 locomotives
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Anon
Coventry's BR built shed storing withdrawn locomotives including in this view three ex-LMS 2P 4-4-0 locomotives

View of three ex-LMS 4-4-0 2Ps including Nos 40694, 40699 in store outside of Coventry's new shed on 26th April 1960
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Anon
Three ex-LMS 4-4-0 2Ps including Nos 40694, 40699 in store outside of Coventry's shed on 26th April 1960
Ex-LMS 4-4-0 2P No 40657 is seen to the rear of an unidentified class mate on road 4 inside Coventry's new shed
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Anon
Ex-LMS 4-4-0 2P No 40657 is seen to the rear of an unidentified class mate inside Coventry's new shed
A view of a line of condemned ex-LMS locomotives including a 4MT 2-6-4T, two 2P 4-4-0 standing in Coventry station's now closed engine shed
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Anon
A line of condemned ex-LMS locomotives, a 4MT 2-6-4T, two 2P 4-4-0 standing in in front of the closed shed
Ex-LMS 5XP 4-6-0 No 45723 'Fearless' and ex-LMS 4P 2-6-4T No 42586 stand smokebox to smokebox with each other
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J Hyde
Ex-LMS 5XP 4-6-0 No 45723 'Fearless' and ex-LMS 4P 2-6-4T No 42586 stand smokebox to smokebox with each other
Another view of ex-LMS 5XP Jubilee Class 4-6-0 No 45599 'Bechuanaland' lying in store at Coventry shed
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J Hyde
Another view of ex-LMS 5XP Jubilee Class 4-6-0 No 45599 'Bechuanaland' lying in store at Coventry shed

Ex-LMS 4MT 2-6-4T No 42669 is seen in a different pose standing in front of ex-LMS 0-4-4T 1P No 41902 which hs its chimney removed
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Anon
Ex-LMS 4MT 2-6-4T No 42669 is standing in front of ex-LMS 0-4-4T 1P No 41902 which hs its chimney removed
View of ex-LMS 0-4-4T 2P No 41909 having had its chimney removed after its sale to Dick Blenkinsop
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Anon
View of ex-LMS 0-4-4T 2P No 41909 having had its chimney removed after its sale to Dick Blenkinsop

Maps of Coventry shed circa 1920

Layout of Coventry Shed in 1920 showing the original 42 foot turntable being accessed direct from the coaling road
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Ordnance Survey
Layout of Coventry Shed in 1920 showing the original 42 foot turntable being accessed direct from the coaling road
Layout of Coventry Shed post WWI showing its proximity to the carriage sidings and the Leamington branch line
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Preston Hendry
Layout of Coventry Shed post WWI showing its proximity to the carriage sidings and the Leamington branch line

Coventry Station Locomotives seen at Coventry Station Coventry Shed (43)

The LMS and its successor, British Railways, undertook to film various aspects of operating steam locomotives and other railway operations. We have provided below links to some of the films related to shed operation that we know exist. Films on other aspects of railway operations can be viewed via our Video and Film Clip section.

"Wash and Brush Up" 1953
Shows the procedures that a steam engine goes through as part of its regular maintenance cycle. The locomotive being featured in the film is a British Railways Standard Class 5MT 4-6-0 No 73020 at 6D Chester (Midland shed. (25 minutes 19 seconds)

LMS On the Shed - Part One of Two
Various shots of an engine being prepared and serviced ready for its next trip. Includes actions and responsibilities of crew. (9 minutes 44 seconds)

LMS On the Shed - Part Two of Two
Various shots of an engine being prepared and serviced ready for its next trip. Includes actions and responsibilities of crew. (9 minutes 31 seconds)